Is Your Web Copy Any Good?

If a business has a website, it has web copy. And if a business has web copy, it has a problem.

 

What’s the problem? Simply put: how do you tell if your web copy is any good or not?

 

That’s a good question, and I’m going to answer it. But before I answer that, I’ve got a few other little things I’d like to address.

 

First and foremost: you might be scratching your head right about now and saying, “I’m not sure what web copy is, and at this point I’m too afraid to ask.”

 

It’s very important that we define what we’re talking about from the beginning, so here’s a rough definition: web copy is any written (or typed) communication on your website that’s meant to encourage your visitors to take action.

 

That’s not an official definition. That’s my definition. So if you think it’s a stupid definition, you can go ahead and take it up with yours truly.

 

(Don’t worry: I promise I’m going to get around to telling you how to tell if your copy is any good very soon.)

 

Here’s the thing: copywriting is all about action.

 

You’re not writing for your own personal expression. You’re not writing to tell the world all about your dreams, your hopes, or what you have nightmares about. You’re not writing to tell people what you think of the controversy of the week.

 

You’re not editorializing. You’re copywriting. And copywriting is about action.

 

If you fail to inspire action, you’ve failed at copywriting. Everything in copywriting is geared toward action.

 

Don’t forget that.

 

Kinds of bad web copy.

I know I’ve promised you I’ll tell you how to tell if your copy is any good, but that can wait.

 

First things first: how do you tell if your web copy is really bad? How do you tell if it’s so bad it’s not only failing to make sales, but it’s become a liability to you and your business?

 

I’ve come across three types of spectacularly bad web copy in my time. Let’s talk about them:

 

  1. Boring web copy.

 

This covers anything that doesn’t catch and hold the reader’s attention.

 

There’s a widely-cited statistic that says most visitors to a website only stay there for about 15 seconds. Companies that don’t want to put effort into their copy use that as an excuse for lazy writing.

 

Listen: some people don’t like to read online. That’s the way it is.

 

Write the most sparkling-brilliant web copy you can imagine. Write golden words sprinkled with angel dust. No matter what you do, your copy is never going to sell to people who don’t read.

 

But this is no reason to write bad web copy.

 

Good copy may not grab all the non-readers. But bad copy will alienate all the readers.

 

You’ve got to seduce your reader a little. Show you care. Show you see them. Show you know what they want.

 

Put real effort into your copy, and it’ll come back to you.

 

  1. Pushy web copy.

 

We all know web copy is written because it’s supposed to cause some action.

 

Your readers are smart people. They can tell if you’re trying to sell them something. They can tell if you want something from them. They can tell a lot more than you realize.

 

So there’s no reason to beat your readers’ eardrums by shouting, “Buy my thing!” in every other sentence.

 

They can tell you want something from them. Good copy isn’t about constantly reminding them of that fact. It’s about keeping their interest, inviting them to imagine buying from you, and giving them a positive emotional experience so they won’t resent you when you ask them to do something.

 

You’re going to have to invite them to take action sooner or later. But effective copy is written in such a way that your ideal reader has imagined doing the thing you want them to do long before you actually ask them to do it.

 

Even when we know we’re being guided to a conclusion, we like being allowed to feel like it was our idea all along.

 

  1. Completely nonsensical web copy.

 

The worst web copy—and I’ve seen this on more occasions than I like to admit—is the stuff that reads like it was written in a foreign language and run through Google translate.

 

It’s not only poorly written. It’s not only pushy or heavy-handed. It’s not only keyword-stuffed garbage.

 

It’s prose so awful you expect to read “All your base are belong to us” any minute. It doesn’t make sense, and it doesn’t drive business.

 

It reads like it was written by an experimental computer program. And it drives away customers without as much as a second glance.

 

So that’s the bad stuff. What about the good stuff?

 

Good web copy works beautifully—but what is it?

I’m going to start out by saying something that probably sounds entirely obvious, but if you learn this one thing you’ll have learned the most important thing in all web copywriting.

 

This is central to everything. This is the alpha and omega of copywriting. Without this, you can’t hope to write the good stuff. With this, even a lousy writer can improve over time.

 

This is the North Star of copywriting.

 

This is the one point you can navigate by. In all the chaos and uncertainty of vague ideas, this is how you find your way. Out in the desert of not knowing how to get results, this is how you get results.

 

What is it? What’s the most important thing to know about copywriting?

 

It’s simple: good web copy improves your site’s conversions.

 

Good copy make customers more likely to buy from you. It makes prospects more likely to contact you. It makes visitors more likely to start a conversation with you.

 

Anything that makes it more likely that someone will buy from your company is good copywriting. That means you have to be intentional and experimental about your copywriting.

 

You don’t want your copy to be too short, because short copy doesn’t give enough time to create an effective emotional experience for the reader.

 

Here’s a tip: good copy is as long as it needs to be.

 

If it takes one word to skyrocket your sales, so be it. If it takes 10,000 words to get the same result, that’s just as good.

 

Our preconceptions cut our legs out from under us all the time. Don’t let your preconception of how long your web copy “ought” to be torpedo its effectiveness.

 

Good copy is about sales. Never forget that.

 

How do you write good web copy?

You know what you’re aiming for.

 

You’re aiming to make the kind of copy that will have clients with fat wallets drooling to buy from you.

 

You’re aiming to make the kind of copy that will send your business to the next level.

 

You’re aiming to make the kind of copy that will let you retire to your nice mansion in Honolulu where you eat gold flakes for breakfast.

 

Good web copy is a magnet for the green stuff. I hate the phrase “a license to print money,” but good web copy is probably the next best thing.

 

So how do you do it? How do you make your readers desperate to buy from you? How do you raise their buying desire to such a fever pitch that they’re ready to beg you to take their money?

 

It’s not hard. It’s complex, but not hard. With time, patience, and a little old-fashioned effort, you can do it for yourself.

 

Start out by getting to know your ideal customer in detail. You have to be ready to write for this person as confidently and as clearly as if she were sitting across the table from you.

 

You want to know this person. You want to know what they do all day. You want to know what they’re afraid of.

 

But most of all, you want to know what they want.

 

What do they want? What drives them? What is this person’s ultimate fantasy?

 

Are you selling sports equipment to an 18-year-old horndog? Show him all the gorgeous women who will be all over him the instant he buys.

 

Are you selling an investment plan to a woman who loves travel? Show her the canals of Venice or the rising peaks of the Himalayas.

 

Are you selling sandwiches to hungry people? Just show them the sandwich.

 

J.P. Morgan once said, “A man always has two reasons for doing anything: a good reason and the real reason.”

 

When you write convincing, persuasive, seductive copy, it’s your job to know both. You want to entwine the good reason (“I’ll improve my income and be free of what’s holding me back.”) with the real reason (“I love the feeling of having someone go to great lengths to persuade me.”).

 

Good copywriting is all about understanding what motivates people. With a little time and effort, any clever person can learn that.

 

The best way to learn.

I’m not going to hype the best way to learn copywriting. It’s the same as the best way to learn any other kind of writing.

 

The best way to get better at it is to do it. A lot.

 

Start with your website. Then move on to volunteering with some nonprofits. If you do that for a while you’ll build up a nice portfolio with a lot of samples you can show to potential clients.

 

I’ll have plenty of more posts about copywriting in the future—in fact, I’m thinking about writing a whole series of pieces on copywriting methods. But the best teacher for copywriting skills is practice.

 

There are a million techniques I could mention right here. (If you’re clever, I’m sure you’ve noticed a few in this article.) But there’s no substitute for experience.

 

A natural talent for writing is nothing without diligent practice.

 

So if you’re a beginning copywriter, I’d advise practice. Lots and lots of practice.

 

But not only that: it’s also helpful for you to get in touch with some of the freelance writing communities gathered around the internet. If you’re looking for guidance, that’s the place to go.

 

And you could do worse than to let an experienced copywriter take a look at some of your work and critique it. I know some writers are awfully shy about their work, but (sad to say) writing doesn’t work very well if it never meets a reader.

It can be hard to submit your work to criticism. But if you give it to someone knowledgeable and trustworthy, it can be one of the quickest ways to improve your writing technique.

 

Best of luck to you. Copywriting can be an extremely rewarding profession, both personally and professionally. I love it, myself, and I hope I grow a little better at it every day.

 

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns about freelancing. I’m always trying to tailor this blog to your needs, so I’d appreciate the help.

 

And I know some of you don’t like to post publicly, so feel free to contact me by email at geofreycrow@crowcopywriting.com if you’d rather do it that way.

 

Good luck, and good copywriting!

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The 3 Crucial Rules for Beginning Copywriters

 

So you want to be a copywriter, eh? Join the club.

 

Copywriting means different things to different people. Some people write cheap, useless, badly-written blog posts for their clients and call that copywriting.

 

(Luckily their clients don’t pay them very well for their trouble, because they know what they’re buying.)

 

You don’t want to be that kind of copywriter, do you?

 

Of course not. And there’s no reason you should be! There’s no reason a clever, forward-thinking writer should have to work for peanuts. There’s no reason a clever, forward-thinking writer should have to work on projects that aren’t challenging or interesting. There’s no reason a clever, forward-thinking writer can’t make a very good living from freelance writing.

 

I hope you’re detecting a theme here. It’s clear as day: if you want to make a good living as a copywriter you’ve got to be clever and forward-thinking.

 

And what does that mean? Well, I’m glad you asked.

 

First off, it means becoming a copywriting master. It’s not enough to have run-of-the-mill skills and a run-of-the-mill plan. You need excellent skills and an excellent plan.

 

Would you go into battle without a plan and expect good results? Of course not. Then why would you go into your copywriting without a plan and expect good results?

 

I want you to imagine something: imagine you’re the most brilliant copywriter to ever live. Your words weave a magic spell that makes your reader helpless to resist you. Every line you put down is so perfect that your readers can hardly wait to throw their hard-earned greenbacks at you. You have such brilliant powers of persuasion that you can get anyone to do anything.

 

That’s a nice image, isn’t it?

 

Unfortunately, it’s impossible to write copy that’s that persuasive. You can’t write anything that’s going to convince people to buy something they never wanted in the first place. That would be wrong and unethical, first of all. And second of all it would take more persuasive power than any human being could possibly have.

 

No, friends, I’m not going to claim that good copywriting can spin straw into gold. You won’t be retiring to a beach house in Tahiti next week.

 

It won’t be easy. It won’t be overnight. It won’t even be automatic. But if you follow the principles I’m about to set out for you, you will be able to improve your copywriting.

 

And that’s the first step.

 

The Golden Rule of All Copywriting: Know Your Mark

Imagine you’re on vacation at the beach in Saint Augustine, Florida. You’re looking out at the iron-gray waters of the Atlantic, lying with your head up and a tasty drink at your side. You feel the sunlight on your skin, all shiny and warm in the afternoon.

 

You’re daydreaming about dolphins. You don’t have a care in the world. You wonder if you can find a service to let you ride a dolphin…

 

“Excuse me,” says a salesman who appears out of nowhere, “Would you be interested in buying a full-length winter parka?”

 

What do you say? Would you be interested?

 

Of course not! This guy doesn’t have a clue who you are or where he is. What’s he doing, interrupting a perfectly good day by asking you if you want to wear a winter parka? What an idiot!

 

You don’t sell winter parkas to vacationers on the beach in the middle of the summer.

 

It’s not that it’s a bad parka. It’s not that these people will never need a parka. It’s not even that they’re constitutionally opposed to buying a parka. It’s just that the salesman was clueless about context.

 

If you want your mark to buy from you, you’ve got to make contact with them when and where they’re receptive to your message.

 

People want to buy things. People like to buy things. But they don’t like to be sold to.

 

That’s why it’s your job to know who you’re dealing with, what they want, and how it’s going to help them. But most importantly, it’s your job to know these three things about your mark:

 

  1. What are their pain points? The mark who is on the point of buying from you has one big problem you can solve for them. They want to buy the reassurance that you know their pain and know how to resolve it. So you must understand their pain.

 

  1. What are their dreams? Maybe they want to retire to a nice place on Key West. Maybe they want to write pretty love poems every day. Maybe they want to be rich enough to buy the Earth itself. Whatever it is, you want to know what your mark wants and how buying from you will move them closer to their ultimate desire.

 

  1. What are their fears? Are they afraid of getting kicked out and having to live on the streets? Are they afraid of failing to live up to their potential? Are they afraid of missing out on the biggest chance of their lives? Sometimes people need their fears to encourage them to take action. Know their fears so you can deploy them when the time is right.

 

Action Step: Imagine your ideal client. With that client in mind, answer all three of the questions I just laid out. The more in-depth the better. (You can never have too much knowledge!) Write at least a paragraph in answer to each question. You’ll be surprised what you can already discover!

 

The Second (But Equally Important) Rule of Copywriting: Know Your Product

Let’s go back to your salesman on the beach. Just for the moment, let’s pretend you’re not entirely uninterested in what he has to say.

 

“What’s so great about that parka?” you ask.

 

“Well, uh…” the salesman says. He looks down at the parka in his hands. He scratches his nose. He says, “Well, it’s got really nice pockets!”

 

You’re not having any of this. “So does every parka I’ve ever seen. What’s so great about this one?”

 

Our salesman doesn’t know what to say. He doesn’t know his product. He only knows he wants this scenario to end with you holding the parka and him holding your cash.

 

A clever, forward-thinking copywriter always knows the product.

 

That means all the “dry, boring details.”

 

That means all the exciting benefits the product has.

 

That even means anticipating all the objections a prospect might have before purchasing.

 

You want to know your product so well that when you close your eyes you see the design specs on the back of your eyelids.

 

Okay, I’ll admit it: you don’t have to know it that well. Don’t tattoo any design specs to the inside of your eyelids. But you get the point.

 

In order to be an effective copywriter, you need to know the product you’re selling in detail. You need to know what it does. You need to know all the problems with it. You need to know.

 

A professional copywriter takes time to get to know the product. If it’s something you can try out for yourself, go ahead and do that. If it’s something (such as a staffing agency) that’s way beyond your needs as a freelance writer, take the time to get to know the process and the people.

 

Maybe you won’t use all this knowledge, directly. But it’s important to know this stuff, because it’s going to color your copy in ways you can’t anticipate.

 

I know that sounds vague, but you’re a writer. You know exactly what I mean. Sometimes when you’re writing, the spirit takes you and you end up producing a phrase you never thought you could have found before. And what’s true of writing a poem or a story is still true of copywriting: it’s when you fondle the details that you get your best results.

 

So get to know the details. Even if you don’t use them directly, the knowledge will come through in the authority of your tone.

 

Action Step: Imagine your ideal client again. Why are your copywriting services absolutely what your ideal client needs? Why might your ideal client object to buying from you? How do you plan on meeting those objections? Answer these questions, and you’ll be on the right track.

 

The Third (and Honestly the Most Important) Rule of Copywriting: Write the Best Words

Much as I’d like to return to our salesman on the beach, that analogy isn’t going to work here. I want to talk to you straight out, writer to writer.

 

Copywriting isn’t a form of expressive writing. You’re not here to express your personality or to develop your own unique style.

 

Copywriting is about writing the words that cause your reader to take action.

 

Every expressive writer’s heart sinks a little at those words. Believe me, I know that pain: when I put on my “copywriting hat” I have to take off my “novelist’s hat.” And I won’t lie to you. It stings a little.

 

It stings because I’m using words as tools instead of as a free play of expression. It’s worth it because it pushes my writing skills to the limits, so I learn things I never would have learned any other way. (Not to mention the fact that it pays the bills!)

 

The reason I’m telling you all this is because I want you to understand that copywriting is a different type of writing from any other. It’s as different from poetry or fiction as poetry or fiction are different from each other.

 

It’s got a different texture. It’s got a different structure. It’s got a different set of conventions and a different method of preparation.

 

You’ve got to learn how to make words cause action. When you put on your “copywriting hat,” you not only have to make your readers feel, but you’ve got to convince them to do something. It’s quite a challenge, and it gets harder every day.

 

You’ll have to seize your reader’s attention.

 

You’ll have to arouse your reader’s desire.

 

You’ll have to make your reader afraid of not acting.

 

And you’ll have to become the best at it. You’ll have to become so good at it that it becomes second nature. You’ll have to become so sure of yourself and your writing that it all comes off as if you’ve never felt a twinge of self-doubt in your life.

 

It’s quite a challenge. But if you can learn how to connect with your reader, you’ll be able to do things you’d never have thought you could.

 

You’ll be able to help people find solutions they’d never have been confident to seize otherwise.

 

You’ll be able to amaze your clients with your clever words.

 

And most importantly, you’ll be able to make that dream of making a good living from writing into a reality.

 

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns about copywriting. I’m always trying to tailor this blog to your needs, so I’d appreciate the help.

 

And I know some of you don’t like to post publicly, so feel free to contact me by email at geofreycrow@crowcopywriting.com if you’d rather do it that way.

 

Good luck, and good copywriting!

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Are These 10 Mistakes Ruining Your Web Copy?

 

You don’t need me to tell you bad copy hurts your business.

 

It doesn’t matter how much effort you put into your site if your copy is bad. Design might get eyeballs, but good words close sales.

 

For your prospects, your website is the first point of contact with your brand.

 

This is where your visitors decide if you’re running a reputable business or if they should move along.

 

Do you think they’ll listen to somebody who sounds like everybody else?

 

Put it this way: do you want to work with somebody who sounds like everybody else?

 

Or would you rather work with somebody who has something to say, gets excited, and says something real?

 

The worst mistake I see businesses make with their copy is that it sounds too much like copy.

 

It’s stuffed with generic phrases that hold your guests at a distance instead of drawing them into a conversation.

 

Bad copy looks something like this:

 

“We are recruiting rockstars, dedicated to being decent human beings, cleaning up after ourselves, and making sure that good things happen to good people. We have a list of company values that are exactly the same as the company values you see everywhere else. We make the same vague guarantees in the same squirrelly language every other company does. And since we look and sound like everybody else, you know for sure that we’re unique and have an insightful approach. That’s what makes us the best!”

 

Okay, maybe it doesn’t look exactly like that. But you know what I’m talking about.

 

It’s bad, it’s generic, and it’s damaging your company.

 

Why do companies produce this kind of disaster time and again?

 

Simple: it feels safe.

 

When you slip into the same tired phrases you’ve seen a million companies use, you don’t have to risk anything.

 

You don’t have to think hard. You don’t have to work hard.

 

When your writing is a stack of boring, annoying, and ineffective clichés, you can get the copy written in no time.

 

When you slap content on your site without planning, you hold your visitors at a distance. You make yourself unapproachable.

 

Bad copy signals to your visitor, “I’m not interested in talking to you or getting to know your problem. I’m smarter than you. I know more than you. You should buy my thing because it’s what I want.”

 

Of course nobody’s thinking any of that consciously. But when you write bad copy, you send a clear message.

 

Copy is meant to start a conversation. So it ought to be conversational.

 

The rules of good copywriting are like the rules of good conversation.

 

So what are those rules?

 

A good conversationalist gives others their turn to talk.

 

A good conversationalist listens to what other people say.

 

A good conversationalist makes others feel good and actively finds ways to connect.

 

That’s what good copy is meant to be like.

 

Is your copy hurting your business? Maybe.

 

To help you find out, I’ve put together this list of ten clear signs of poor copy.

 

If you find yourself identifying with a big portion of this list, you might have a problem.

 

What does bad copy do?

 

  1. Bad Copy is Boring

You know what this is like. It’s happened a million times.

 

You’re looking for a new lawn service, birthday clown, or web promoter. So you go on Google and click the first link that appears.

 

What do you see on the main page?

 

You see a gigantic wall of text in tiny font. It’s written like a textbook, and by the time you’re halfway through the first paragraph you’re falling asleep.

 

That’s bad copy.

 

In the internet age, you have to seduce the reader a little. You have to show you can get the job done, but you also have to show you know how to have fun.

 

Bottom line: if it doesn’t get read, it won’t sell anything.

 

  1. Bad Copy is All About You

Let’s go back to the conversational rules we were talking about earlier.

 

Answer me this: how much do you want to talk to somebody who is only interested in talking about themselves?

 

Someone who keeps jawing about how they had the measles that one time.

 

Someone who keeps mentioning they drive a Ferrari.

 

Someone who keeps telling you about how their business won an industry award.

 

If you met someone who could only go on about themselves, you wouldn’t talk to them for long. What makes you think your customers want to work with you if you only tell them about yourself?

 

Here’s the secret: good copy is all about the customer.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Speak to Your Customer’s Pain

Your prospect has a problem, otherwise they wouldn’t be on your website in the first place. People don’t end up reading your copy by accident.

 

Put it this way: if someone visits your site and reads your copy, they’re interested in hearing what you have to say.

 

If your visitors are qualified prospects, they’re at least open to the possibility of buying from you.

 

So if they’re on your site and considering buying from you, the only thing stopping them will be if you mess it up.

 

You have to prove you understand their problem and encourage them to take the next step.

 

If they don’t take the next step, it’s because you did something wrong.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Have a Clear Goal

A lot of web copy gets written only to take up space. Many businesses treat web copy like it’s a nasty but necessary chore.

 

It’s no wonder you don’t see any use for it if you don’t have a clear objective in mind!

 

Good copy is always written with a specific goal in mind.

 

Maybe it’s generating sales.

 

Maybe it’s encouraging visitors to subscribe to a mailing list.

 

Maybe it’s enticing visitors to comment on your blog.

 

With good copy, everything is oriented toward one specific goal. Everything is calculated to create one specific effect.

 

Copy without a specific goal only takes up space.

 

  1. Bad Copy isn’t Directed at a Specific Audience

If you don’t know who your audience is, you don’t know what your audience cares about.

 

If you don’t know what your audience cares about, you don’t know what they’re looking for.

 

If you don’t know what they’re looking for, you don’t know what they need.

 

And if you don’t know what they need, you can’t help them.

 

The people reading your copy aren’t interested in what you’d like to say to the world as a whole.

 

They’re interested in what you can say to them and the problem they’re experiencing now.

 

That’s why you need to make a customer persona.

 

You need to know what your ideal customer cares about and what they’re looking for when they decide to buy from you. Otherwise you’ll write a generic appeal that doesn’t speak to them.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Build Authority

If you’re not confident in your writing, people will sense it.

 

If you’re going to get people to listen to you, you have to convey that you know what you’re talking about.

 

There are complicated wrinkles here, but here’s the gist: if you’re not sure about your message, it’ll show up in your writing.

 

Maybe you’ll make unnecessary self-deprecating jokes.

 

Maybe you’ll use technical-sounding language to make yourself sound superficially impressive.

 

Maybe you’ll sneak in little phrases that create the impression you’re not sure of your message.

 

Authority doesn’t mean playing tricks on your reader or telling anyone what to do. It means conveying confidence and certainty in your message.

 

You must convey authority.

 

  1. Bad Copy Depends on Statistics

First off: there’s nothing wrong with using statistics in your copy.

 

It’s important to give your reader a few facts to justify their decision. But facts and statistics are not the main motivator for your customers.

 

We’re human beings.

 

We want more pleasure and less pain.

 

We want social connections.

 

We want people to notice us and see what makes us unique.

 

Most of all, we want emotional experiences. There’s a part of us that’s tired of all the responsibility and self-control we have to practice every day.

 

Good copy can give your visitors a chance to let go so you can take care of their worries for a while.

 

Statistics can help justify a purchase intellectually, but buying is an emotional decision. Never forget that.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Engage the Emotions

Let’s hit the same idea from a different angle: as professionals, we have to pretend to be something other than what we really are.

 

I don’t mean that in a negative way. It’s just that when we think of the “ideal businessperson,” we imagine someone who’s kind of like a robot.

 

Always motivated. Always ready. Always enthusiastic.

 

If you’re reading this, you know the ideal I’m talking about.

 

And if you’re like every other human being, you don’t live up to that ideal all the time.

 

There’s a knee-jerk feeling we need to write copy for that “ideal businessperson” who doesn’t really exist.

 

Don’t do that.

 

You’re writing for human beings who have their own stresses, their own tragedies, their own frustrations, and their own private lives.

 

The “ideal businessperson” doesn’t have human emotions and human weaknesses. The human beings you’re reaching out to do.

 

Write for them, not for the ideal.

 

  1. Bad Copy is Full of Buzzwords and Jargon

I talked about this at the beginning of this post. It was true then, and it’s still true now: if your copy is full of buzzwords, you’re holding the reader at a distance.

 

You don’t want to hold the reader at a distance. That’s the opposite of what you want to do.

 

If you’re going to turn your reader into a customer, you have to develop rapport and human contact.

 

It feels like using jargon makes you look well-informed. That’s a mistake.

 

Jargon only alienates your reader.

 

Explain things in terms a non-specialist can understand, and you’ll communicate more effectively.

 

Good copy is about action and communication. It’s not about proving how smart you are.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Have a Call to Action

This is a big one. I’ve seen brilliant copy foul things up at the last second this way.

 

Remember what we were talking about earlier, with the importance of specific goals?

 

Well, here’s the thing: good copy is about three things:

 

  • Getting your reader’s attention.
  • Building an emotional connection.
  • Encouraging the reader to take action.

 

The problem is that some people don’t ask the reader to take action.

 

Your readers are not psychics. No matter how strong your connection, if you don’t tell them what you’d like them to do, they won’t do it.

 

You have to take the initiative to close with a strong call to action.

 

Ask the reader to comment on your post.

 

Ask the reader to call the phone number for a sales representative.

 

Ask the reader to shoot you an email.

 

It’s not being pushy. It’s just being willing to follow through with what you started.

 

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns about copywriting. I’m always trying to tailor this blog to your needs, so I’d appreciate the help.

 

And I know some of you don’t like to post publicly, so feel free to contact me by email at geofreycrow@crowcopywriting.com if you’d rather do it that way.

 

Good luck, and good copywriting!

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What are Case Studies? (Part 2 of 3)

 

Yesterday we talked about what case studies are, and I gave you a few ideas on how a great case study can show off what’s special about your business. Today I’m going to give you a step by step guide to producing a case study that grabs your prospect and forces them to read every word.

 

(Just a side note: if you haven’t taken a look at yesterday’s article yet, here’s a quick rundown on what you need to know.

 

A case study is a marketing tool that shows your prospects the value of your offering.

 

Most of the time, a case study will:

 

  • Share a compelling story that shows your how your company solved a customer’s problem.
  • Present the story from your customer’s point of view.
  • Display an angle that shows the unique thing that makes your company shine.
  • Educate your prospects on the value of your offering.

 

Case studies are usually about one to four pages long. The very best of them tells a story that informs, entertains, and inspires.)

 

I’ll be honest with you: it’s not easy to craft a brilliant case study. But with a lot of time, hard work, and dedication, you should be able to get the job done. Of course, a professional copywriter will usually be eager to take that work off your hands if you don’t have the time.

 

So without any further ado, let’s get writing, shall we?

 

  1. Find one of your best, most typical customers, and schedule an interview with a representative.

Now, this is a pretty simple step in and of itself, but I wanted to take some time to talk about it so I could draw your attention to the two key words here. What are the key words?

 

They are: best and most typical (okay, technically that’s three words. Sorry.).

 

You want to have your interview with your best customers for plenty of reasons. First off, if they’re you’re best customers, you’re more likely to be able to get a compelling story when you interview them, right?

 

And I know this is probably pretty obvious, but I might as well say it anyways: just like it’s best to get a review or a testimonial from your best customers, it’s best to get a case study from them, too. They’ve got the most value out of your offering and they’ll have an infectious enthusiasm that will spread to the people who read your case study.

 

It might be a little less obvious why I say you should go with your most typical customers. But that’s just a matter of practicality. I mean, if you’re trying to show your prospects what your offering can do, you’re not going to want them to read about that customer who buys a half-dozen special services and none of your typical offerings, are you?

 

Of course not. You’re going to want to interview the customer who buys your most common offer. After all, you’re telling this customer’s story. Don’t you want it to be one your typical prospect can relate to?

 

Sure you do. So break out that phone or keyboard and schedule that interview!

 

  1. Prepare for and conduct the interview.

When it comes to it, a phone or Skype interview is just fine for this part. It takes some practice to get good at interviewing, but let me just give you a few pointers so you can get the information you need.

 

Here’s the main thing to remember when you’re conducting interviews: never forget what you need to get out the interview.

 

What’s that, then? First off, you want story you can share with your prospects to show them the value of your offer.

 

That means you want to know all the facts and figures of the company. You want to be able to explain what they do and why they do it. Simple enough, right?

 

Second, you want to know about the problem that led this company to approach yours. (Protip: make sure you’ve got a clear description of the problem and the pain points involved.)

 

Third: you want to know how your company solved the problem. (Of course, you already know this, but you want to get the story from your customer’s point of view.) When the time comes to write your story, this will be where your company swoops in to save your customer.

 

Last: you want to know the results. That means you want to know the statistics that prove the value you’ve provided.

 

With a practiced hand, you should be able to fit all this information into a short interview. No pressure, you’ve got this.

 

  1. Write your first draft.

Now that you’ve got it all together, it’s time to get into the writing process. Luckily for you, case studies generally have a pretty standard structure, so you don’t have a lot to worry about on that front.

 

Remember: you’re telling a story here. The same skills go into crafting a good case study that go into telling a good story.

 

So what’s a good story? A good story has a beginning, a middle, and an end. In the beginning, you introduce your hero—in this case, your customer. In the middle, you introduce your hero’s problem and show them trying to solve it. And in the end, they solve it—with a little help from you and your company, of course!

 

Of course, describing basic story structure is one thing and actually writing an effective story is another thing. Skillful writing is a matter of practice and mastery, just like any other craft. But with time, discipline, and sheer will power, you can learn it.

 

  1. Edit and revise.

This part of the process is pretty obvious, I’ll admit. You tidy up your sentence structure. You check your spelling. You eliminate your passive verbs and you eliminate every word that doesn’t contribute to the meaning of your story.

 

You’ll probably want to give it to a few people you can trust to give you honest feedback on your work. Ask them if everything makes sense and if it all fits together just right.

 

(Trust me on this: I’ve written things I thought made perfect sense, but when I ran it by a couple of readers I found out I’d made some silly mistakes. You never can tell what people might misunderstand.)

 

Now that you’ve edited, pay attention to this part: before you use your case study for anything, you should run it by your customer and have them sign off on it. This is important: you want to get your customer to approve of the final article before you do anything with it.

 

So that’s the process! As always, thanks for reading and best of luck to you and your endeavors. Be sure to take a look at yesterday’s article if you want to know more about case studies. I’ll tell you some more about what you can use them for tomorrow!

 

Feel free to get in touch if you’ve got any questions. You can reach me in my comment section, or if you like you can email me at geofreycrow@crowcopywriting.com.

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