AIDA: How Can Freelancers Write Seductive Copy?

 

The first time I landed a copywriting client, my blood ran cold.

 

I sat in front of my laptop, staring blankly at the screen. My stomach felt like a giant empty hole. I only had one thought in my mind: what do I do now?

 

I felt like a fake. I felt like a sham. I felt like I was about to get found out.

 

Let’s be honest: I was so shocked and so anxious that I couldn’t think straight. I wanted to dig a hole in the ground and bury myself in it somewhere where nobody could ever, ever find me. Especially my client.

 

Because here’s the thing: I’d never really done copywriting before.

 

Sure, I’d read blog posts about it. I’d read stacks of books about it. I’d even copied out great pieces of long-form copy by hand just to get a feel for the style. But I’d never actually taken a copywriting project from beginning to end before.

 

How could I do it?

 

For several weeks up to that point, I’d been thinking of nothing except how I was going to get myself some clients. Cold calls. Prospecting emails. Social media promotion. It had been a constant grind to sell my work.

 

Suddenly it dawned on me that now that I’ve sold my work it was time to do the work. I felt like the proverbial dog chasing a car. I didn’t know what to do now that I’d caught one.

 

If you stick with freelancing long enough, you’re going to run into this problem. How do you deal with it? One word: AIDA.

 

AIDA

A good writer knows that structure is one of the most important elements of writing. A good essay follows a certain structure. A good screenplay follows a three-act structure. A good poem is almost all structure.

 

AIDA is the acronym that gives you the four ingredients of good copy, in the order you need to provide them. Those four elements are:

  1. Attention

First things first: you have to find a way to get the reader to look at your writing for more than a couple of seconds.

 

  1. Interest

Once you’ve got the reader’s attention, you have to tease out her curiosity. Address her interests and convince her that it’s worth her time to read what you’ve written.

 

  1. Desire

Gradually, you convince the reader (or even better—you allow her to convince herself) that the product or service you’re selling is valuable and desirable. This is a subtle thing. You don’t push it on her: you invite her to see what’s good about your offer.

 

  1. Action

Granted, there comes a time when you have to ask for the reader to buy, or to take whatever action you’re interested in having her take. This doesn’t have to be forceful to be effective. If you’ve done your job in the other sections, the right reader will be eager to take action by this point.

This is the basic structure of all good copywriting. Granted, you can experiment with this structure as you learn what you’re doing and improve your craft, but these are the fundamentals.

 

Those are the basics of the AIDA acronym: attention, interest, desire, action. The most effective copywriters already use this method, and it’s a crucial part of any copywriter’s education.

 

So let’s get in-depth about the application: how do you put AIDA to work?

 

Attention

I want you to imagine something for me. Imagine you’re scrolling on Facebook. You see two links come up, back to back.

 

One of them says “Hey, click the link and buy my thing!” The other one shows a picture of an attractive young woman looking sadly off into the distance and says, “17 Things Only People With Anxiety Understand.”

 

You probably already know what I’m going to ask, but I have to ask it anyways: which one are you more likely to click on? We both know it’s the second one.

 

Now, why is it the second one? Speaking for myself, let’s throw out a few possible explanations:

 

  • I can identify with the title. I’m neurotic as all-get-out, and I know clicking the link will probably show me a lot of experiences I can personally relate to.
  • It makes me feel a little special to feel like I can understand things that only people with anxiety can understand.
  • The number 17 is a little off. It’s an unusual number, and it catches my attention because of that.
  • I hope you won’t judge me too harshly for this, but (speaking only for myself) there’s no image more likely to get my attention than a picture of an attractive young lady.

 

Now, I know what you’re thinking: all I’m doing here is analyzing how clickbait headlines work. And you’re right.

 

But here’s the point: clickbait headlines work for a reason, and if you want to catch attention online you have to understand those reasons. Nothing in the online world gets read unless it gets clicked first.

 

Titles. Images. Headlines. These are all critical elements of making sure your content gets read.

 

That’s attention.

 

Interest

Now that you’ve convinced the audience to click your link, you have to show them it’s worthwhile to actually read your content. How do you do that?

 

There are any number of ways to solve this problem but they all boil down to this: you need to show your reader enough of what you’re going to say that she wants to know more. This is key.

 

If the reader isn’t curious, the reader isn’t going to take the time to read your copy.

 

Understand this: it’s hard to get your content read. You’re competing against the rest of the world for your reader’s attention. For the moment, you have to be more interesting than Neil deGrasse Tyson. You have to be more inspiring than Oprah Winfrey. You have to be more seductive than Kim Kardashian.

 

That’s the crucial challenge. In copywriting, you have to achieve two things: you have to A) convince the reader to read your content even after it becomes clear that you’re selling something, and B) convince the reader to actually take action.

 

If you can’t seize the reader’s interest, you’ve got nothing. If you can’t keep the reader’s interest, you’ve still got nothing. Without interest, there is no copywriting.

 

Make your reader feel something. Emotion is the trigger to action.

 

Desire

Now that you’ve hooked your reader, it’s time for the fun to begin. The magic happens when you’ve caught the reader’s interest enough to keep reading, but not yet enough to get them to buy.

 

This is the part where you seduce the reader. You show the reader how wonderful things will be if he buys what you’re offering.

 

You show the reader what’s so great about your offer. You have him imagine buying from you—but you don’t directly ask him to do so yet. You show the reader how great it will be to own your product or service.

 

You show him why it’s desirable. But you don’t only do that.

 

You also show him how bad it will be if he doesn’t own it.

 

Because that’s the subtletly of desire: it’s not only a matter of wanting to have something pleasurable. It’s also about avoiding something painful.

 

You have to make not buying appear as painful as possible. You have to show the reader how bad things will be if he misses this chance to buy. You have to make the reader feel that intense fear of missing out.

 

That’s the key to copywriting: you have to show the reader how good it will be to buy from you and how bad it will be not to buy from you. Ninety percent of copywriting is emotion.

 

So tell the reader that buying your product or service will lower his monthly costs by 50 percent. But also tell him that the window of opportunity to get the edge on the competition is shrinking. Alternate positive and negative emotion, and you can work wonders.

 

That’s desire.

 

Action

In a way, this is the simplest part of copywriting. You’ve already got the reader’s attention. You’ve already convinced the reader to read your content. You’ve already given the reader the chance to fall in love with your product.

 

So you’ve put in the leg work. But a bad call to action can kill all the hard work you’ve put in up to this point. It can take all the tension you’ve created and leave it flat.

 

So what are the elements of a good call to action? Let’s name a few:

 

  • A good call to action doesn’t pressure the reader.

If there’s any time for pressuring the reader, it’s in the “desire” phase. Sure, you might add in a few phrases like “Act now!” or “Supplies Limited,” but you don’t try to make the decision for the reader. It’s always the reader’s decision.

 

  • A good call to action tells the reader exactly how to order/buy.

In other words, make sure your instructions are clear. You don’t want somebody to give up on the buying process because it’s too complicated, do you?

 

  • A good call to action gets written.

I’ve seen amazing pieces of copywriting go south because the writer was too afraid to actually make the ask. Copywriting is not for the timid. Ask for the purchase or suffer the consequences.

 

That’s your call to action.

 

AIDA: Yes, You Have To

I know you might be thinking, “This is all good and well, but do I really have to write this way?”

 

The short answer: yes.

 

The long answer: yes, but after years and years of practice you might be able to figure out a better structure if you happen to be a genius.

 

These are the fundamentals of copywriting. The best way to learn good copywriting is to practice using these techniques till you’re sick of them. Write, and write, and write. Try, and try, and try.

 

AIDA has been developed over the long history of the profession of copywriting. It’s the best basic structure anybody’s been able to come up with.

 

Remember what we were saying earlier about three-act structure in filmmaking? Well, three-act structure has been around since the time of Sophocles. Maybe we’ll never know why that’s the most effective way to write a story, but it is.

 

It’s the same with AIDA. This is the way you convince people to buy. As long as there are copywriters, copy is going to be written this way.

 

So it might be worth your while to get in touch with an experienced copywriter who can help you along your way. The experienced copywriters of the world probably know a little more about the subject than you do. You could definitely do worse than to put their expertise to work for you.

 

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns about freelancing. I’m always trying to tailor this blog to your needs, so I’d appreciate the help.

 

And I know some of you don’t like to post publicly, so feel free to contact me by email at geofreycrow@crowcopywriting.com if you’d rather do it that way.

 

Good luck, and good copywriting!

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Is Your Web Copy Any Good?

If a business has a website, it has web copy. And if a business has web copy, it has a problem.

 

What’s the problem? Simply put: how do you tell if your web copy is any good or not?

 

That’s a good question, and I’m going to answer it. But before I answer that, I’ve got a few other little things I’d like to address.

 

First and foremost: you might be scratching your head right about now and saying, “I’m not sure what web copy is, and at this point I’m too afraid to ask.”

 

It’s very important that we define what we’re talking about from the beginning, so here’s a rough definition: web copy is any written (or typed) communication on your website that’s meant to encourage your visitors to take action.

 

That’s not an official definition. That’s my definition. So if you think it’s a stupid definition, you can go ahead and take it up with yours truly.

 

(Don’t worry: I promise I’m going to get around to telling you how to tell if your copy is any good very soon.)

 

Here’s the thing: copywriting is all about action.

 

You’re not writing for your own personal expression. You’re not writing to tell the world all about your dreams, your hopes, or what you have nightmares about. You’re not writing to tell people what you think of the controversy of the week.

 

You’re not editorializing. You’re copywriting. And copywriting is about action.

 

If you fail to inspire action, you’ve failed at copywriting. Everything in copywriting is geared toward action.

 

Don’t forget that.

 

Kinds of bad web copy.

I know I’ve promised you I’ll tell you how to tell if your copy is any good, but that can wait.

 

First things first: how do you tell if your web copy is really bad? How do you tell if it’s so bad it’s not only failing to make sales, but it’s become a liability to you and your business?

 

I’ve come across three types of spectacularly bad web copy in my time. Let’s talk about them:

 

  1. Boring web copy.

 

This covers anything that doesn’t catch and hold the reader’s attention.

 

There’s a widely-cited statistic that says most visitors to a website only stay there for about 15 seconds. Companies that don’t want to put effort into their copy use that as an excuse for lazy writing.

 

Listen: some people don’t like to read online. That’s the way it is.

 

Write the most sparkling-brilliant web copy you can imagine. Write golden words sprinkled with angel dust. No matter what you do, your copy is never going to sell to people who don’t read.

 

But this is no reason to write bad web copy.

 

Good copy may not grab all the non-readers. But bad copy will alienate all the readers.

 

You’ve got to seduce your reader a little. Show you care. Show you see them. Show you know what they want.

 

Put real effort into your copy, and it’ll come back to you.

 

  1. Pushy web copy.

 

We all know web copy is written because it’s supposed to cause some action.

 

Your readers are smart people. They can tell if you’re trying to sell them something. They can tell if you want something from them. They can tell a lot more than you realize.

 

So there’s no reason to beat your readers’ eardrums by shouting, “Buy my thing!” in every other sentence.

 

They can tell you want something from them. Good copy isn’t about constantly reminding them of that fact. It’s about keeping their interest, inviting them to imagine buying from you, and giving them a positive emotional experience so they won’t resent you when you ask them to do something.

 

You’re going to have to invite them to take action sooner or later. But effective copy is written in such a way that your ideal reader has imagined doing the thing you want them to do long before you actually ask them to do it.

 

Even when we know we’re being guided to a conclusion, we like being allowed to feel like it was our idea all along.

 

  1. Completely nonsensical web copy.

 

The worst web copy—and I’ve seen this on more occasions than I like to admit—is the stuff that reads like it was written in a foreign language and run through Google translate.

 

It’s not only poorly written. It’s not only pushy or heavy-handed. It’s not only keyword-stuffed garbage.

 

It’s prose so awful you expect to read “All your base are belong to us” any minute. It doesn’t make sense, and it doesn’t drive business.

 

It reads like it was written by an experimental computer program. And it drives away customers without as much as a second glance.

 

So that’s the bad stuff. What about the good stuff?

 

Good web copy works beautifully—but what is it?

I’m going to start out by saying something that probably sounds entirely obvious, but if you learn this one thing you’ll have learned the most important thing in all web copywriting.

 

This is central to everything. This is the alpha and omega of copywriting. Without this, you can’t hope to write the good stuff. With this, even a lousy writer can improve over time.

 

This is the North Star of copywriting.

 

This is the one point you can navigate by. In all the chaos and uncertainty of vague ideas, this is how you find your way. Out in the desert of not knowing how to get results, this is how you get results.

 

What is it? What’s the most important thing to know about copywriting?

 

It’s simple: good web copy improves your site’s conversions.

 

Good copy make customers more likely to buy from you. It makes prospects more likely to contact you. It makes visitors more likely to start a conversation with you.

 

Anything that makes it more likely that someone will buy from your company is good copywriting. That means you have to be intentional and experimental about your copywriting.

 

You don’t want your copy to be too short, because short copy doesn’t give enough time to create an effective emotional experience for the reader.

 

Here’s a tip: good copy is as long as it needs to be.

 

If it takes one word to skyrocket your sales, so be it. If it takes 10,000 words to get the same result, that’s just as good.

 

Our preconceptions cut our legs out from under us all the time. Don’t let your preconception of how long your web copy “ought” to be torpedo its effectiveness.

 

Good copy is about sales. Never forget that.

 

How do you write good web copy?

You know what you’re aiming for.

 

You’re aiming to make the kind of copy that will have clients with fat wallets drooling to buy from you.

 

You’re aiming to make the kind of copy that will send your business to the next level.

 

You’re aiming to make the kind of copy that will let you retire to your nice mansion in Honolulu where you eat gold flakes for breakfast.

 

Good web copy is a magnet for the green stuff. I hate the phrase “a license to print money,” but good web copy is probably the next best thing.

 

So how do you do it? How do you make your readers desperate to buy from you? How do you raise their buying desire to such a fever pitch that they’re ready to beg you to take their money?

 

It’s not hard. It’s complex, but not hard. With time, patience, and a little old-fashioned effort, you can do it for yourself.

 

Start out by getting to know your ideal customer in detail. You have to be ready to write for this person as confidently and as clearly as if she were sitting across the table from you.

 

You want to know this person. You want to know what they do all day. You want to know what they’re afraid of.

 

But most of all, you want to know what they want.

 

What do they want? What drives them? What is this person’s ultimate fantasy?

 

Are you selling sports equipment to an 18-year-old horndog? Show him all the gorgeous women who will be all over him the instant he buys.

 

Are you selling an investment plan to a woman who loves travel? Show her the canals of Venice or the rising peaks of the Himalayas.

 

Are you selling sandwiches to hungry people? Just show them the sandwich.

 

J.P. Morgan once said, “A man always has two reasons for doing anything: a good reason and the real reason.”

 

When you write convincing, persuasive, seductive copy, it’s your job to know both. You want to entwine the good reason (“I’ll improve my income and be free of what’s holding me back.”) with the real reason (“I love the feeling of having someone go to great lengths to persuade me.”).

 

Good copywriting is all about understanding what motivates people. With a little time and effort, any clever person can learn that.

 

The best way to learn.

I’m not going to hype the best way to learn copywriting. It’s the same as the best way to learn any other kind of writing.

 

The best way to get better at it is to do it. A lot.

 

Start with your website. Then move on to volunteering with some nonprofits. If you do that for a while you’ll build up a nice portfolio with a lot of samples you can show to potential clients.

 

I’ll have plenty of more posts about copywriting in the future—in fact, I’m thinking about writing a whole series of pieces on copywriting methods. But the best teacher for copywriting skills is practice.

 

There are a million techniques I could mention right here. (If you’re clever, I’m sure you’ve noticed a few in this article.) But there’s no substitute for experience.

 

A natural talent for writing is nothing without diligent practice.

 

So if you’re a beginning copywriter, I’d advise practice. Lots and lots of practice.

 

But not only that: it’s also helpful for you to get in touch with some of the freelance writing communities gathered around the internet. If you’re looking for guidance, that’s the place to go.

 

And you could do worse than to let an experienced copywriter take a look at some of your work and critique it. I know some writers are awfully shy about their work, but (sad to say) writing doesn’t work very well if it never meets a reader.

It can be hard to submit your work to criticism. But if you give it to someone knowledgeable and trustworthy, it can be one of the quickest ways to improve your writing technique.

 

Best of luck to you. Copywriting can be an extremely rewarding profession, both personally and professionally. I love it, myself, and I hope I grow a little better at it every day.

 

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns about freelancing. I’m always trying to tailor this blog to your needs, so I’d appreciate the help.

 

And I know some of you don’t like to post publicly, so feel free to contact me by email at geofreycrow@crowcopywriting.com if you’d rather do it that way.

 

Good luck, and good copywriting!

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Are These 10 Mistakes Ruining Your Web Copy?

 

You don’t need me to tell you bad copy hurts your business.

 

It doesn’t matter how much effort you put into your site if your copy is bad. Design might get eyeballs, but good words close sales.

 

For your prospects, your website is the first point of contact with your brand.

 

This is where your visitors decide if you’re running a reputable business or if they should move along.

 

Do you think they’ll listen to somebody who sounds like everybody else?

 

Put it this way: do you want to work with somebody who sounds like everybody else?

 

Or would you rather work with somebody who has something to say, gets excited, and says something real?

 

The worst mistake I see businesses make with their copy is that it sounds too much like copy.

 

It’s stuffed with generic phrases that hold your guests at a distance instead of drawing them into a conversation.

 

Bad copy looks something like this:

 

“We are recruiting rockstars, dedicated to being decent human beings, cleaning up after ourselves, and making sure that good things happen to good people. We have a list of company values that are exactly the same as the company values you see everywhere else. We make the same vague guarantees in the same squirrelly language every other company does. And since we look and sound like everybody else, you know for sure that we’re unique and have an insightful approach. That’s what makes us the best!”

 

Okay, maybe it doesn’t look exactly like that. But you know what I’m talking about.

 

It’s bad, it’s generic, and it’s damaging your company.

 

Why do companies produce this kind of disaster time and again?

 

Simple: it feels safe.

 

When you slip into the same tired phrases you’ve seen a million companies use, you don’t have to risk anything.

 

You don’t have to think hard. You don’t have to work hard.

 

When your writing is a stack of boring, annoying, and ineffective clichés, you can get the copy written in no time.

 

When you slap content on your site without planning, you hold your visitors at a distance. You make yourself unapproachable.

 

Bad copy signals to your visitor, “I’m not interested in talking to you or getting to know your problem. I’m smarter than you. I know more than you. You should buy my thing because it’s what I want.”

 

Of course nobody’s thinking any of that consciously. But when you write bad copy, you send a clear message.

 

Copy is meant to start a conversation. So it ought to be conversational.

 

The rules of good copywriting are like the rules of good conversation.

 

So what are those rules?

 

A good conversationalist gives others their turn to talk.

 

A good conversationalist listens to what other people say.

 

A good conversationalist makes others feel good and actively finds ways to connect.

 

That’s what good copy is meant to be like.

 

Is your copy hurting your business? Maybe.

 

To help you find out, I’ve put together this list of ten clear signs of poor copy.

 

If you find yourself identifying with a big portion of this list, you might have a problem.

 

What does bad copy do?

 

  1. Bad Copy is Boring

You know what this is like. It’s happened a million times.

 

You’re looking for a new lawn service, birthday clown, or web promoter. So you go on Google and click the first link that appears.

 

What do you see on the main page?

 

You see a gigantic wall of text in tiny font. It’s written like a textbook, and by the time you’re halfway through the first paragraph you’re falling asleep.

 

That’s bad copy.

 

In the internet age, you have to seduce the reader a little. You have to show you can get the job done, but you also have to show you know how to have fun.

 

Bottom line: if it doesn’t get read, it won’t sell anything.

 

  1. Bad Copy is All About You

Let’s go back to the conversational rules we were talking about earlier.

 

Answer me this: how much do you want to talk to somebody who is only interested in talking about themselves?

 

Someone who keeps jawing about how they had the measles that one time.

 

Someone who keeps mentioning they drive a Ferrari.

 

Someone who keeps telling you about how their business won an industry award.

 

If you met someone who could only go on about themselves, you wouldn’t talk to them for long. What makes you think your customers want to work with you if you only tell them about yourself?

 

Here’s the secret: good copy is all about the customer.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Speak to Your Customer’s Pain

Your prospect has a problem, otherwise they wouldn’t be on your website in the first place. People don’t end up reading your copy by accident.

 

Put it this way: if someone visits your site and reads your copy, they’re interested in hearing what you have to say.

 

If your visitors are qualified prospects, they’re at least open to the possibility of buying from you.

 

So if they’re on your site and considering buying from you, the only thing stopping them will be if you mess it up.

 

You have to prove you understand their problem and encourage them to take the next step.

 

If they don’t take the next step, it’s because you did something wrong.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Have a Clear Goal

A lot of web copy gets written only to take up space. Many businesses treat web copy like it’s a nasty but necessary chore.

 

It’s no wonder you don’t see any use for it if you don’t have a clear objective in mind!

 

Good copy is always written with a specific goal in mind.

 

Maybe it’s generating sales.

 

Maybe it’s encouraging visitors to subscribe to a mailing list.

 

Maybe it’s enticing visitors to comment on your blog.

 

With good copy, everything is oriented toward one specific goal. Everything is calculated to create one specific effect.

 

Copy without a specific goal only takes up space.

 

  1. Bad Copy isn’t Directed at a Specific Audience

If you don’t know who your audience is, you don’t know what your audience cares about.

 

If you don’t know what your audience cares about, you don’t know what they’re looking for.

 

If you don’t know what they’re looking for, you don’t know what they need.

 

And if you don’t know what they need, you can’t help them.

 

The people reading your copy aren’t interested in what you’d like to say to the world as a whole.

 

They’re interested in what you can say to them and the problem they’re experiencing now.

 

That’s why you need to make a customer persona.

 

You need to know what your ideal customer cares about and what they’re looking for when they decide to buy from you. Otherwise you’ll write a generic appeal that doesn’t speak to them.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Build Authority

If you’re not confident in your writing, people will sense it.

 

If you’re going to get people to listen to you, you have to convey that you know what you’re talking about.

 

There are complicated wrinkles here, but here’s the gist: if you’re not sure about your message, it’ll show up in your writing.

 

Maybe you’ll make unnecessary self-deprecating jokes.

 

Maybe you’ll use technical-sounding language to make yourself sound superficially impressive.

 

Maybe you’ll sneak in little phrases that create the impression you’re not sure of your message.

 

Authority doesn’t mean playing tricks on your reader or telling anyone what to do. It means conveying confidence and certainty in your message.

 

You must convey authority.

 

  1. Bad Copy Depends on Statistics

First off: there’s nothing wrong with using statistics in your copy.

 

It’s important to give your reader a few facts to justify their decision. But facts and statistics are not the main motivator for your customers.

 

We’re human beings.

 

We want more pleasure and less pain.

 

We want social connections.

 

We want people to notice us and see what makes us unique.

 

Most of all, we want emotional experiences. There’s a part of us that’s tired of all the responsibility and self-control we have to practice every day.

 

Good copy can give your visitors a chance to let go so you can take care of their worries for a while.

 

Statistics can help justify a purchase intellectually, but buying is an emotional decision. Never forget that.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Engage the Emotions

Let’s hit the same idea from a different angle: as professionals, we have to pretend to be something other than what we really are.

 

I don’t mean that in a negative way. It’s just that when we think of the “ideal businessperson,” we imagine someone who’s kind of like a robot.

 

Always motivated. Always ready. Always enthusiastic.

 

If you’re reading this, you know the ideal I’m talking about.

 

And if you’re like every other human being, you don’t live up to that ideal all the time.

 

There’s a knee-jerk feeling we need to write copy for that “ideal businessperson” who doesn’t really exist.

 

Don’t do that.

 

You’re writing for human beings who have their own stresses, their own tragedies, their own frustrations, and their own private lives.

 

The “ideal businessperson” doesn’t have human emotions and human weaknesses. The human beings you’re reaching out to do.

 

Write for them, not for the ideal.

 

  1. Bad Copy is Full of Buzzwords and Jargon

I talked about this at the beginning of this post. It was true then, and it’s still true now: if your copy is full of buzzwords, you’re holding the reader at a distance.

 

You don’t want to hold the reader at a distance. That’s the opposite of what you want to do.

 

If you’re going to turn your reader into a customer, you have to develop rapport and human contact.

 

It feels like using jargon makes you look well-informed. That’s a mistake.

 

Jargon only alienates your reader.

 

Explain things in terms a non-specialist can understand, and you’ll communicate more effectively.

 

Good copy is about action and communication. It’s not about proving how smart you are.

 

  1. Bad Copy Doesn’t Have a Call to Action

This is a big one. I’ve seen brilliant copy foul things up at the last second this way.

 

Remember what we were talking about earlier, with the importance of specific goals?

 

Well, here’s the thing: good copy is about three things:

 

  • Getting your reader’s attention.
  • Building an emotional connection.
  • Encouraging the reader to take action.

 

The problem is that some people don’t ask the reader to take action.

 

Your readers are not psychics. No matter how strong your connection, if you don’t tell them what you’d like them to do, they won’t do it.

 

You have to take the initiative to close with a strong call to action.

 

Ask the reader to comment on your post.

 

Ask the reader to call the phone number for a sales representative.

 

Ask the reader to shoot you an email.

 

It’s not being pushy. It’s just being willing to follow through with what you started.

 

Let me know if you have any questions or concerns about copywriting. I’m always trying to tailor this blog to your needs, so I’d appreciate the help.

 

And I know some of you don’t like to post publicly, so feel free to contact me by email at geofreycrow@crowcopywriting.com if you’d rather do it that way.

 

Good luck, and good copywriting!

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